Endometriosis by subtype/location

'Invisible', microscopic disease

Patient articles & presentations

Invisible microscopic endometriosis - Is it invisible, or just not there?
The concept of invisible microscopic endometriosis (IME) is frequently thrown around by gynecologists and used as an excuse for incomplete surery. What is invisible microscopic disease and does it really exist?


Scientific articles & presentations

Is "microscopic" peritoneal endometriosis invisible?
This study follows on from that of Murphy and colleagues (1986) by examining healthy-appearing areas of peritoneum for the presence or absence of endometriosis in a series of patients undergoing laparoscopy. Unlike the original study, this study found an occurrence of microscopic invisible endometriosis of zero, suggesting that it is in fact possible by the use of both modest peritoneal magnification and the criteria of normal peritoneum defined in this study to distinguish peritoneum lacking endometriosis with 100% precision.

Cystic ovarian endometriosis

Scientific articles and presentations

Ovarian endometriosis: symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
This article provides an in-depth overview of the symptoms, diagnosis and surgical management of ovarian endometriosis and related pathologies.

Ovarian endometriosis: a marker for more extensive pelvic and intestinal disease
Compared with patients without ovarian endometriosis, patients with ovarian endometriosis have more pelvic and intestinal areas involved by endometriosis. Patients with ovarian endometriosis and intestinal endometriosis are more likely to require full-thickness or segmental bowel resections for complete removal of intestinal disease. These findings persisted when adjusted for previous therapies or presence of superficial versus deep ovarian disease. Importantly, when a physicians focuse primarily on treating ovarian disease, patients may go underdiagnosed and undertreated.

Gastrointestinal endometriosis

Patient articles & presentations

An introduction to intestinal endometriosis
What is intestinal endometriosis, how common is it, what symptoms does it cause, and how is it treated?


Scientific articles and presentations

Intestinal endometriosis: symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
This article provides an in-depth overview of the symptoms, diagnosis and surgical management of intestinal endometriosis.

Rectovaginal endometriosis

Scientific articles and presentations

Rectovaginal endometriosis: symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
This article provides an in-depth overview of the symptoms, diagnosis and surgical management of rectovaginal endometriosis.

Urinary tract endometriosis

Scientific articles and presentations

Endometriosis of the urinary tract: symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
This article provides an in-depth overview of the symptoms, diagnosis and surgical management of endometriosis of the urinary tract.

Thoracic endometriosis

Patient articles & presentations

Diaphragmatic endometriosis - similar, but different
What is diaphragmatic endometriosis, what are the signs and symptoms, and how can it be treated?

Q&A on diaphragmatic endometriosis
Dr. Redwine answers a series of patient questions on diaphragmatic endometriosis.


Scientific articles and presentations

Diaphragmatic endometriosis: symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment
This article provides an in-depth overview of the symptoms and diagnosis of diaphragmatic endometriosis and its surgical management via laparotomy. Please note: this paper was first written/published at a time when diaphragmatic disease was generally treated via laparotomy (large incision), while recent techniques are increasingly enabling surgeons to remove diaphragmatic disease via laparoscopy (keyhole surgery).


Surgical footage

Diaphragmatic endometriosis
Diaphragmatic is a rare presentation of endometriosis and is commonly associated with widespread pelvic disease. This film examines the diagnosis and surgical treatment of diaphragmatic disease in Dr. Redwine's practice in the early 1990s. Nowadays diaphragmatic disease may be excised via laparoscopy and thoracoscopy rather than requiring laparotomy.

Cutaneous endometriosis

Patient articles & presentations

Q&A on cutaneous endometriosis
Dr. Redwine answers a series of patient questions on cutaneous endometriosis (endometriosis involving the skin, the umbilicus and surgical scars).

Adenomyosis

Patient articles & presentations

Adenomyosis - A common cause of uterine symptoms after age 30
What is adenomyosis? What are the symptoms? How does it different from endometriosis?

Q&A on adenomyosis
Dr. Redwine answers a series of patient questions on adenomyosis.

Endometriosis and peritoneal pockets

Scientific articles and presentations

Peritoneal pockets and endometriosis: Confirmation of an important relationship, with further observations
The association between pelvic peritoneal pockets and endometriosis has long been documented in the literature. The present study examines a series of cases of peritoneal pockets among patients with endometriosis to provide further insight into the character and possible origin of such peritoneal structural abnormalities and their relationship to the disease.


Surgical footage

Peritoneal pockets in women with endometriosis
This surgical video documents the presence of peritoneal pockets in a series of patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis. Peritoneal pockets (abnormalities in the structure of the peritoneum that result in pocket-like formations) are common in women with endometriosis and are frequently associated with endometriotic tissue either within or lining the rim of the pocket. This tissue should also be excised during surgery, just like any other area of the peritoneum involved by disease. Typically, lesions found within peritoneal pockets are superficial but, as can be seen in this video, even deep fibrotic lesions may be found inside.


Endometriosis in distant sites

Scientific articles and presentations

Endometriosis in distant sites
This article examines cases of endometriosis in distant sites, including musculoskeletal endometriosis, inguinal canal endometriosis, endometriosis of the central and peripheral nervous systems, liver endometriosis, cutaneous endometriosis, thoracic endometriosis, endometriosis in men and instances of vicarious menstruation.